Menu Menu

170+ Groups Supporting Net Neutrality Send Letter To FCC Chairman

170+ Groups Supporting Net Neutrality Send Letter To FCC Chairman

Over 170 groups, including the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), wrote a letter this week and sent it to Ajit Pai, the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, and also Senators John Thune and Bill Nelson, in order to ask them to honor the net neutrality rules implemented back in 2015. In this letter, the groups emphasized how net neutrality has not only made the world wide web a generator of opportunities, but also as a venue for delivering social, political, and economic empowerment to all who access it. The 170 plus groups represented net neutrality advocates from the media, technology, and the arts, among many others. Their letter comes on the same date President Donald Trump has nominated Pai to serve another half decade on the commission.

 

Net neutrality basically endorses the idea that all traffic on the information superhighway should be treated equally, regardless of whether one is browsing Instagram, updating one’s status on Facebook, or streaming the latest films and TV shows from Netflix. Most users agree with the basic concept of net neutrality, but it has become a topic of much discussion in recent years, especially when the FCC classified broadband providers under the same strict rules used on telephone networks. 

 

Now, it is quite possible that net neutrality will again be talked about especially after Pai (who is not too keen on net neutrality rules) took the position of FCC Chairman in January early this year. Pai has not confirmed yet whether the FCC will reverse the net neutrality rules put in place in 2015, or if it will wait for Republicans on Congress to draft a new bill to replace the one to years ago. 

 

Ever since Pai took over the FCC, he has already launched several new programs, and sometimes appears to be looking to point the agency to a different direction, at least as compared to what Pai’s predecessor had in mind. Many believe that he will be making a move to repeal some of the rules on net neutrality. Naturally, net neutrality advocates have expressed some concern that Pai’s push for relaxing the rules will only give broadband and wireless companies more power, which could lead to higher pricing for end users and fewer options when it comes to services. But for cable and telecom companies, a loosening of the rules will foster better innovation and business growth.

Section: